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states could do that. excuse me, carole. >> thank you. mr. perot? >> well, it's cost effective to help russia succeed in its revolution. pennies on the dollar compared to going back to cold war. russia's still very unstable; they could go back to square one and worse. still, all the nuclear weapons are not dismantled. i'm particularly concerned about the intercontinental weapons; the ones that can hit us. we've got agreements but they're still there. with all this instability and breaking in the republics, and all the middle eastern countries going over there shopping for weapons, we've got our work cut out for us so we need to stay right on top of that and constructively help them move toward democracy and capitalism. we have to have money to do that. we have to have our people at work. see, for 45 years we were preoccupied with the red army. i suggest now that our no. 1 preoccupation is red ink in our country, and we've got to put our people back to work, so that we can afford to do these things we want to do in russia. we cannot be the policemen for the world any longer. we spent $3
. biden. i came here to hear dr. biden. i will turn it over to carol. >> i am glad. one reason i am supporting president obama is that i have the feeling he is grounded in the real world and as i said in researching dr. biden, i found out that she has children and we have a lot in common. got married in the 1970's, had children in the 1980's. we both have been educators. i started teaching in minneapolis in 1970 and taught mostly in the inner city. in 2004 i retired. she began as a high school english teacher and in her time she taught as a psychiatric hospital for adolescents which had to be a challenging assignment. later she moved on to teach at community colleges and still works as a professor at a community college. i found a blog entry from 2008. apparently she sat in on a conference call and one of the participants said i can't remember when i have interviewed a public figure who sounded so much like the people i work with every day, and of course that's probably because i am a teacher. some of that made me feel that she kind of knows what it's like to be in a classroom with
, and governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee. my name is carole simpson and i will be the moderator for tonight's 90 minutes' debate coming to you from the campus of the university of richmond in virginia. >> tonight's program is unlike any other presidential debate in history -- we're making history now and it's pretty exciting. an independent polling firm has selected an audience of 209 uncommitted voters from this area. the candidates will be asked questions by these voters on a topic of their choosing -- anything they want to ask about. my job as moderator is to, you know, take care of the questioning, ask questions myself if i think there needs to be continuity and balance, and sometimes i might ask the candidates to respond to what another candidate may have said. now the format has been agreed to by representatives of both the republican and democratic campaigns. and there is no subject matter that is restricted -- anything goes, we can ask anything. after the debate, the candidates will have an opportunity to make a closing statement. so, president bush, i think you said it
want to thank carol for her comments. i think you should come on the road with me. [laughter] thank you, governor, for being here. i really appreciated. i appreciate your friendship. most of all, i am here because i want to thank all of you for what you are doing for our campaign. i see that you all have to the boards and are all getting ready -- you are getting ready to go out and canvas. thank you so much for being here today, what you are doing for this campaign. over the last couple of weeks, i have been traveling around the country. yesterday i was in iowa. tomorrow i will be in wisconsin. i see the energy and the enthusiasm that is building, just like here, just like in this room today. we are moving forward. i think this campaign is really connecting to people because it is about people's lives. for me, it is no different. it connects to my life as well. even if joe or not running for vice president, i would still be involved in this campaign. as carol said, i am a full-time teacher. as she knows as a teacher, teaching is not just what i do, it is who i am. i am sure there are ot
respect, i'm sorry. bush: excuse me, i don't want to -- i don't want to, no go ahead carole. >> governor clinton. >> i get wound up because i feel strongly --- >> yes you do. >> let me say, first of all, to you that i believe so strongly in the question you ask that i suggested this format tonight. i started doing these formats a year ago in new hampshire. and i found that we had huge crowds because all i did was let people ask questions and i tried to give very specific answers. i also had a program starting last year. i've been disturbed by the tone and the tenor of this campaign. thank goodness the networks have a fact check so i don't have to just go blue in the face anymore. mr. bush said once again tonight i was going to have a $150 billion tax increase. when mr. quayle said that all the networks said, "that's not true. he's got over $100 billion of tax cuts and incentives." so i'm not going to take up your time tonight. but let me just say this. we'll have a debate in four days and we can talk about this character thing again. but the washington post ran a long editorial today sa
supply of the world and he'd have nuclear weapons. and only the us could do this. excuse me, carole. >> thank you. mr. perot. >> well, it's cost-effective to help russia succeed in its revolution; it's pennies on the dollar compared to going back to the cold war. russia is still very unstable; they could go back to square one, and worse. all the nuclear weapons are not dismantled. i am particularly concerned about the intercontinental weapons, the ones that can hit us. we've got agreements, but they are still there. with all this instability and breaking into republics, and all the middle eastern countries going over there and shopping for weapons, we've got our work cut out for us. so we need to stay right on top of that and constructively help them move toward democracy and capitalism. we have to have money to do that. we have to have our people at work. see, for 45 years we were preoccupied with the red army. i suggest now that our number one preoccupation is red ink and our country and we've got to put our people back to work so that we can afford to do these things we want to d
violence. >> i understand. thank you so much. i want to ask carol goldberg to stand up because she gets to a question that both these men have been passionate about, for governor romney. >> the outsourcing of american jobs overseas has taken a toll on our economy. what plans do you have to put back and keep jobs here in the united states. >> boy, great question, and important question, because you're absolutely right, the place where we've seen manufacturing go has been china. china is now the largest manufacturer in the world. used to be the united states of america. a lot of good people have lost jobs. a half of million manufacturing jobs have been lost in the last four years. that's total over the last four years. one of the reasons for that is that people think it's more attractive in some cases to go offshore than to stay here. we have made it less attractive for enterprises to stay here than to go offshore from time to time. what i will do as president is make sure it's more attractive to come to america again. this is the way we're going to create jobs in this country. it's not b
to carol. >> i am glad. one reason i am supporting president obama is that i have the feeling he is grounded in the real world and as i said in researching dr. biden, i found out that she has children and we have a lot in common. got married in the 1970's, had children in the 1980's. we both have been educators. i started teaching in minneapolis in 1970 and taught mostly in the inner city. in 2004 i retired. she began as a high school english teacher and in her time she taught as a psychiatric hospital for adolescents which had to be a challenging assignment. later she moved on to teach at community colleges and still works as a professor at a community college. i found a blog entry from 2008. apparently she sat in on a conference call and one of the participants said i can't remember when i have interviewed a public figure who sounded so much like the people i work with every day, and of course that's probably because i am a teacher. some of that made me feel that she kind of knows what it's like to be in a classroom with 25 to 30 kids and have to play it by ear. jill biden beli
clinton, the democratic nominee. my name is carole simpson and i will be the moderator for tonight's 90 minutes' debate coming to you from the campus of the university of richmond in virginia. tonight's program is unlike any other presidential debate in history. we're making history now and it's pretty exciting. an independent polling firm has selected an audience of 209 uncommitted voters from this area. the candidates will be asked questions by these voters on a topic of their choosing -- anything they want to ask about. my job as moderator is to, you know, take care of the questioning, ask questions myself if i think there needs to be continuity and balance, and sometimes i might ask the candidates to respond to what another candidate may have said. now the format has been agreed to by representatives of both the republican and democratic campaigns. and there is no subject matter that is restricted. anything goes. we can ask anything. after the debate, the candidates will have an opportunity to make a closing statement. so, president bush, i think you said it earlier, let's get it on
chairman carol eisa. -- daryl isa. >> yesterday made a significant press announcement. the documents in that book all indicate unclassified. are you prepared to deliver those documents to us at this time? >> my understanding is that we made an information available last night and this morning. that material is still here and we would be glad to meet with committee or staff afterwards. >> no, we want it for this hearing. the information was not classified. it was perhaps embarrassing. can you make that available at this time? >> mr. chairman, the individual pieces may be classified, but the totality must be considered to be restricted. the context is important. >> i agree with you. with that, i now move that the unclassified document of september 11, 2012, appearing above the signature of the ambassador, to place in the record. without objection, so ordered, the staff will distribute it. additionally, i move that the document of march 28, 2012, replaced in the record without objection. so ordered. additionally, and these will have to be printed, the document of august 2, 2012, from th
. thank you so much. i want to ask carol goldberg to stand up because she gets to a question that both these men have been passionate about, for governor romney. >> the outsourcing of american jobs overseas has taken a toll on our economy. what plans do you have to put back and keep jobs here in the united states. >> boy, great question, and important question, because you're absolutely right, the place where we've seen manufacturing go has been china. china is now the largest manufacturer in the world. used to be the united states of america. a lot of good people have lost jobs. a half of million manufacturing jobs have been lost in the last four years. that's total over the last four years. one of the reasons for that is that people think it's more attractive in some cases to go than to stay here. we have made it less attractive for enterprises to stay here than to go offshore from time to time. what i will do as president is make sure it's more attractive to come to america again. this is the way we're going to create jobs in this country. it's not by trickle down government saying
time. >> back to los angeles. he carol, a democratic caller. >> good evening. glad to be on the line. i am a democrat, however, i have been unhappy with obama in the last four years, especially the last year or so with his, the way his ideas towards israel who is been a big ally to the united states. then when the situation in benghazi occurred, i felt so bad when the men passed away there. it was utter terror. i felt the white house was not telling the american people the truth from the beginning. and the way they handled it, i am disgusted. i think there comes a time when you have to vote for the right person who you think is going to be able to do the job. i am going to vote for mitt romney. host: on twitter, a comment -- we will see you again the whole debate coming up around 2:00 a.m. eastern time. about 11:00 on the west coast. here's a comment on the facebook page -- next to the augusta, georgia. nathan, a republican. what did you think of the debate? caller: i am voting for mitt romney however, i have some critiques but how he phrased things in the debate. i think he needs to ma
hall meeting, three candidates. me turn to bob -- let me turn to bob and carol and with their reaction. >> i think president bush in that clip came very close to crossing the threshold that this particular voter, the questioner, was tried to get out, and that was the human connection. what was he feeling? and people made a lot of jokes about bill clinton being able to geneothers' pain, at the that he has close to his heart. president bush was already by this point painted as somebody who was disconnected. you will recall the front page of the "the new york times" and he did not know what a scanner was on a grocery store. of course he did. president bush was simply a nice person on the campaign trail in new hampshire, trying to make conversation with a store clerk. that story took root, and is painted a version of him that was so unflattering to everyday people, made him look privileged and above the fray, above the pain, and that left a huge opening for bill clinton in 1992. >> and bob? >> bill clinton had a better response, much more personal on the human level or spots. if i were bil
are talking about the battleground states of iowa. carolas on the -- carol is on the democratic line. caller: i want to ask the gentleman what was his response when the man came out talking about the rape issue and our people in iowa taking that in, whether they even big about the fact that their daughters could be put in harm's way with somebody making a broad statement like that? guest: well, i think voters in the state take those kind of issues very seriously. i think that any comment about that will have an effect on the campaign. this is a state where something like 80% of iowa residents are regular turn to attendees. about 80% of the state is injured somewhere or other on sunday mornings. so these type of issues tend to resonate with them. they have different views about them, but they care about them. so those issues have a lot of impact in iowa. i think that iowa voters tend to react on a gut level to those type of issues, but they do react. host: let's hear from marked in des moines on our independent line. -- from marc. caller: i've been watching the election closely and i would li
, i watch which carol i want to see, because i have them all. if there is a speech that i know you have covered or a book review, i am going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has some value to it, that is going to be one of the first places i looked. i'm a public broadcasting fan. i watched those channels. out of a couple of 1 -- hundred channels i have five or 10 that i will go to and it will include all of the c-span channels. david brugger watches c-span on direct tv. c-span, secreted by cable companies in 1979, brought to you by a service by your provider. "washington journal" continues. host: lauren ashburn is editor in chief and founder of the "daily download," and howard kurtz, editor of "the daily beast." we want to talk about social media and the campaign. talk about how the media is looking at the presidential campaign. guest: i think they are covering the horse race at this point -- what do they need to do, each of them, to knock it out of the park? how important will this debate be going forward in setting expectations? howard and i disagree, but i t
.s.c. and price school. so a special thank you to jen, regina nordall, carol rush, january peterson, heidi row sano and big thank you as well to the u.s.c. event team, public safety team and u.s.c. communications team. to all of you, thank you so much. we are both proud and excited -- thank you. \[applause] we are both proud and excited for the leaders here gathered for today's important conversations and overwhelming outpouring of interest and attending from students and nonstudents including so many leaders from business, nonprofits and governments around the world. today is a beginning but it's also a continuation. having served as both senior adviser and secretary of education to governor schwarzenegger, running this institute is not just an opportunity to continue so many of the great initiatives that arnold in california were at the forefront of but an opportunity for so many committed public servants who worked on those initiatives to see their legacy continue. many of those people are here today, including the governor's chief of staff susan kennedy, many cabinet secretaries, press sec
-great candidate he was before the night of the debate. host: carol in colorado, republican. caller: yes, mr. corn. thank you for taking my call. i will only be on for a few moments and you of the rest of the show, and if you could not interrupt me, please, because it takes away from my time did you can answer me afterwards, if you would, please. first of all, we are continuing to beat a dead horse. the curtain has been pulled back on the debate the other week, and everybody knows the president now. if he cannot go toe to toe with mitt romney and mr. lehrer, how will he go toe to toe with putin. he will bow, that is what he will do. i'm really sick of this 47%, which mitt has already addressed. he said he was not that great a statement that point, we all don't make our points the best way. i am probably not going to do it right now because i'm kind of nervous. but you can say things that really have a truce in the base of eight pit most americans out there think that what he said in that tape, there is a trick to it. we need to clean up -- truth to it. we need to clean up your team may not have s
need help. [unintelligible] host: and that was clinton in georgia. this is carol and maryland. tell us your story. caller: i am always struck in spirit by people and certainly listening to us by phone now and turning the tv off i can really feel the spirit of the last two callers. i am a roman catholic. and i think that we cannot just, like the second to last caller, just let things go their course. we are all responsible. and those who call themselves christians, which is how i feel, we will be judged on judgment day. i am really torn. it is not between obama and mitt romney, it is with my catholic conscience. it is for people to profess themselves like paul ryan as a catholic and they are not really. we cannot support abortion. we cannot make exceptions. given that, i do not know who really is a true blue catholic. or, whether i will compromise the vote, which may go to obama by not voting for mitt romney may. my catholic friends tell me and my bishop's tell me, it is ok to vote for the lesser of the two eagles. in other words they are saying, it is ok -- it is ok to vote for the les
setting in carol. they promised to not cheer at all. we do not want to hear from them, but there will be cheering at the beginning and end it. the questions will be coming from a sioux city journal writer and kate henderson. >> you tell the democrats you were running to prove being a woman was no longer a barrier to public office in iowa. are you asking voters to set aside consideration of your views on issues and a vote for you because you are a woman? >> i think the delegation will be stronger and i am from one of two states who have neve relected a woman. being a small-time person. and being 62 years old is something i bring to this. this makes me a candidate that provides a different view, and i think that this shows my temperament and temperament is going to be important in this race. i think that there are times in our nation's history where you need people who are resolute and dig their heels in, but this is not that time. it was addressed by a man who approached me at the greene county fair. i am not a democrat or a republican, i am and american. i want to go t
in carol stream, illinois, is on our line for democrats, and she is optimistic about the economy. why is that, theresa? caller: well, i am very optimistic. i am very proud and i'm very trusting of our president. and my life story is one of, i had worked for an environmental consulting firm for close to 40 yearsas laid off in february of 2009. and i was able to just not -- definitely not find another job in the field or anything related or anything even near what i was making, which was close to $25 an hour. i am currently working in house cleaning. i clean senior citizens' homes and i do part-time care giving. and, you know, with that, i earn a fair, fair living, something that is below my means in the past, but i am optimistic about our future. i think we just all need to draw upon what our qualities are, maybe our backgrounds. i've gone full circle. when i was a child, i would go help my mother when she cleaned office buildings for doctors. host: and theresa, we're going to leave it there. we're running out of time in this segment, but thanks for your call. thanks to all the callers
extra payments on medicare. i talk to carol, who attended bradley university and today is an engineer because of pell grants. she fears that program will not be available to students down the line. that is not right. and then the worker. dot turner is 61. she has worked at that plant 43 years and her job is gone to china. she is training her chinese replacements. these are the wrong priorities. i want to make sure that medicare and social security are there for future generations. i want to make sure that the incentives that are sending jobs to china go away. and i want to make sure that we balance the budget but with the right priorities. i respectfully ask for your vote. i hope that you will find that i am worthy of that. and i will never stop fighting for the middle-class and working families of this country. >> i like to tell people this fight came to me. while we were running our small business, raising my kids, watching what was happening to this great state and this country, i decided to throw my hat in the ring. look, i don't come from party royalty. my dad was not a lobbyist.
gordon bell, eleanor clift, carol dinkins and lisa matthews for joining us today on the dice. thank you and join the ms. community and on to the next half of this century. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> followed with it again later on the c-span network and you will also find it in the video library at c-span.org. later tonight, watch and join in as the vice-president -- vice- presidential debate begins tonight with the debate preview at 7:00. the debate begins at 9:00 and is 90 minutes and is moderated by martha raddatz. we will open up our phone lines for your reaction to -- or tweets and e-mail, getting underway here at 7:00 right here on c-span, c-span radio, and c- span.org. here is a look at the debate setting, the stage for tonight's debate. the college was founded in 1819 and has posted debate in the past as well. the look here from outside -- there ago outside the debate all. this is actually the festival lawn area where they are having the debate prep this evening. there is a large
the night of the debate. host: carol, in cortez, colorado. republican. guest: thank you for taking my call. i will only be on for a few moments. could not interrupt me, please? i know you want to answer each thing i say. it takes away from my time. you can answer afterward if you would please. we are continuing to beat a dead horse. we are like dorothy out here in the united states. the curtain has been pulled back on the debate. everyone knows the president that we have now. if he cannot go toe to toe with romney and mr. lehrer, how will he go toe to toe with putin? he will bow. i am sick of hearing about this 47%, which mitt has already addressed. he said it was not that great of a statement. we all do not make our points the best way. i am probably not going to right now because i am kind of nervous. you can say things that have the truth in the base of them. most of americans think what he said in the tape there is a truth to it. we need to clean up welfare and things like that. >> all of us would agree to that. he may have not said it the best way. guest: you are wrong if you look at
-- crowley: i understand. obama: and reduce our violence. crowley: ok. thank you so much. i want to ask carol goldberg to stand up, because she gets to a question that both these men have been passionate about. it's for governor romney. >> the outsourcing of american jobs overseas has taken a toll on our economy. what plans do you have to put back and keep jobs here in the united states? romney: boy, great question and important question, because you're absolutely right. the place where we've seen manufacturing go has been china. china is now the largest manufacturer in the world. it used to be the united states of america. a lot of good people have lost jobs. a half a million manufacturing jobs have been lost in the last four years. that's total over the last four years. one of the reasons for that is that people think it's more attractive in some cases to go offshore than to stay here. we have made it less attractive for enterprises to stay here than to go offshore from time to time. we have made it less attractive for enterprises to stay here than to go offshore from time to time. what i w
's priorities. they cannot afford $64. i talked to people like carol who attended bradley university and today is an engineer because of pell grants. she fears it will not be available down the line. and then the workers, we talked about it a couple of times. dot turner has worked there for third -- 43 years in her job has gone to china. she is training her chinese replacement. here is what i want to work on. i want to make sure medicare and social security are there. i want to make sure the incentives go away. i want to make sure we balance the budget with the right priorities. i would like to ask for your vote. i hope you will find a more the of that and i will never stop fighting for the middle-class working families. >> and a closing statement from congress and chilling. >> i'd like to say this fight came to me. we were raising my kids, watching what was happening to this great state and country. i decided to throw my hat in the ring. i do not come from party royalty. my dad was not a lobbyist. he was a bartender. this is about doing the right thing. this is about a fight for america. said
on medicare. i talk to carol, who attended bradley university and today is an engineer because of pell grants. she fears that program will not be available to students down the line. that is not right. and then the worker. dot turner is 61. she has worked at that plant 43 years and her job is gone to china. she is training her chinese replacements. these are the wrong priorities. i want to make sure that medicare and social security are there for future generations. i want to make sure that the incentives that are sending jobs to china go away. and i want to make sure that we balance the budget but with the right priorities. i respectfully ask for your vote. i hope that you will find that i am worthy of that. and i will never stop fighting for the middle-class and working families of this country. >> i like to tell people this fight came to me. while we were running our small business, raising my kids, watching what was happening to this great state and this country, i decided to throw my hat in the ring. look, i don't come from party royalty. my dad was not a lobbyist. my dad was a bartender
productive because you have people like ron paul, carol moseley-braun, willing to make statements covering a question that the other primary candidates will not make because there is to read it -- too much risk for them. one of the thing that the third party candidate to is move the discourse in ways that are not allowable when you have just the two candidates. >> before we even have presidential debates, our system is rigged against third-party candidates. the commission on presidential debates is a wholly owned subsidiary of the two party system. i would like to see us go back to a genuinely independent sponsor, like the lea women voters. the criteria they have for for dissipation of third-party candidates is prohibitively tough. >> first of all, i want to thank the panel. i think we have had informative discussion, a unfortunately, maybe more informative than we will see wednesday night. i hope that is not the case. [laughter] here is my question, and against what we have been talking about. we have this american myth of the president not able to tell a lie. here we are in 2012 almost b
those are more productive because you have people like ron paul, carol moseley-braun, willing to make statements covering a question that the other primary candidates will not make because there is to read it -- too much risk for them. one of the thing that the third party candidate to is move the discourse in ways that are not allowable when you have just the two candidates. >> before we even have presidential debates, our system is rigged against third-party candidates. the commission on presidential debates is a wholly owned subsidiary of the two party system. i would like to see us go back to a genuinely independent sponsor, like the lea women voters. the criteria they have for for dissipation of third-party candidates is prohibitively tough. >> first of all, i want to thank the panel. i think we have had informative discussion, a unfortunately, maybe more informative than we will see wednesday night. i hope that is not the case. [laughter] here is my question, and against what we have been talking about. we have this american myth of the president not able to tell a lie. here we
: and reduce our violence. crowley: ok. thank you so much. i want to ask carol goldberg to stand up, because she gets to a question that both these men have been passionate about. it's for governor romney. >> the outsourcing of american jobs overseas has taken a toll on our economy. what plans do you have to put back and keep jobs here in the united states? romney: boy, great question and important question, because you're absolutely right. the place where we've seen manufacturing go has been china. china is now the largest manufacturer in the world. it used to be the united states of america. a lot of good people have lost jobs. a half a million manufacturing jobs have been lost in the last four years. that's total over the last four years. one of the reasons for that is that people think it's more attractive in some cases to go offshore than to stay here. we have made it less attractive for enterprises to stay here than to go offshore from time to time. what i will do as president is make sure it's more attractive to come to america again. this is the way we're going to create jobs in this
. >> let me turn to carol ann? -- caroyln. >> a question for miss brown. >> thank you for taking the time today. during the second presidential debate, candy crowley interrupted mitt romney. was the moderator following policy? >> the number of moving parts in a town meeting is substantial. you have almost 80 uncommitted voters, citizens chosen to ask questions. the candidates and the moderator is trying to direct something. our plan for town meeting has been the same for other formats. hopefully the moderator can keep things moving with the focus on the candidates. it is asking a lot of the moderator. there are independent and professional journalists will do what they think is necessary to try to keep things moving. we are proud of the job that she did and i don't think she meant in any way to be disrespectful or try to interrupt the flow of the conversation. a town meeting is challenging because of the variables on one very small stage. >> over the years that you have been working in the presidential debates, have you seen any differences in the increasing polarization of political part
during the prime area we are talking about the battleground states of iowa. carol is on the democratic line. caller: i want to ask the gentleman what was his response when the man came out talking about the rape issue and our people in iowa taking that in, whether they even big about the fact that their daughters could be put in harm's way with somebody making a broad statement like that? guest: well, i think voters in the state take those kinds of issues very seriously. i think that any comment about that will have an effect on the campaign. this is a state where something like 80% of iowa residents are regular turn to attendees. about 80% of the state is injured somewhere or other on sunday mornings. -- in church. so these types of issues tend to resonate with them. they have different views about them, but they care about them. so those issues have a lot of impact in iowa. i think that iowa voters tend to react on a gut level to those types of issues, but they do react. host: let's hear from mark in des moines on our independent line. caller: i've been watching the election closely
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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